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Here is some useful information such as developmental milestones, acronyms, links, and mailing lists for parents on speech delays, developmental delays and special ed Please email me below if you think there is an accidental copyright violation

Page Map allows you to move around this page and sub-pages quickly
Places Acronyms Links Mailing Lists Test Scores Other Kids
Places Awards email guestbook Web Rings Site Map
Milestones Places Production Pragmatics Expressive Receptive Hearing EI Screening
Sub Pages IEP Laughs Just Found Out Toe Walker Inspirational Story

image Ever been to an IEP meeting and need a laugh? CLICK HERE image Jun 07, 2010

Acronyms

Links - General / Medical

Links - Special Ed

Links - Speech/Developmental

If you suspect your child may be developmentally delayed in one or more areas, make an appointment with your pediatrician and ask for a referral for an evaluation. Some have a wait and see attitude - it is up to you the parent to decide what you want and advocate for your child. Don't underestimate the power of a parent's "gut" instinct. Insist that your doctor examine your child, get a second opinion if need be. As the parent its up to you to fight for your child's health and well being. It may seem like you are your own conference calling service with the amount of time you spend on the phone calling doctors but ensuring your child is on the right development path is well worth it. Insurance may cover all or part of an evaluation and or therapy (if needed). In the United States there is a program called Early Intervention (EI) for children ages 0 to 3. You can also go through the school system special education department for kids 3 and up. There is no cost to you for these programs unlike going through some programs. If you do have a delayed child, it really helps to watch for small developmental milestones and be careful about comparing them against other children.

Click Here to see Laura Dyer MCD latest book Look Who's Talking published in 2004. Here is my review from inside the front cover "Laura's book is wonderful. It should be included with the owner's manual as each child is born"

If your child is a toe-walker CLICK HERE for an article on it. If you recently found out your child is delayed - read this essay CLICK HERE

Inspirational Story Click Here Oct 25, 2004


Links - Autism, PDD, Hyperlexia

Links - Sensory Integration

SI problems can occur when one or more of the senses are under or over sensitive. For example a child with over sensitive tactile senses may resist hair washing, being touched or hugged, or eating many foods. One with under sensitive tactile senses may crave being hugged or touched. One good book on the subject is "The Out Of Sync Child" by Carol Kranowitz available at amazon.com You may also want to check out "Love Jean" by Jean Ayres, Philip R. Erwin, and Zoe Mailloux "Inspiration for Families Living With Dysfunction of Sensory Integration"
Links - Apraxia / Dyspraxia / DCD
CHERAB Jun 9 2004

My name is Jeanne Buesser. I am parent of two special needs children with communication impairments. I also am outreach coordinator for a world wide organization called the Cherab Foundation which gives support to professionals and parents of children with communication disorders. Cherab stands for Communcation Help Education Reseach Apraxia Base. If you would like to start a support group in your area or you know of resources, speech and language specialists, developmental pediatricians etc. Please contact us

or

You can also visit our websites at www.cherab.org or www.speechville.com or you can also read The Late Talker book , written by Marilyn Agin MD, Lisa Geng, and Malcolm Nicholl St. Martin's Press. Also check out the website ldaamerica.org Please pass this information on to anyone who could use it. Jeanne Buesser President Apraxia Network of Bergen County (New Jersey, United States of America)


Some Internet Mailing Lists You Can Join
AN Example: Click The AUTISM link and type in subscribe autism in the email message body

Speech and Language Milestones Gard, Gilman, and Gorman (1993) Speech Production

9-12 months

12-18 months

18-24 months

24-30 months

30-36 months

36-42 months

42-48 months

48-54 months


Pragmatics

9-12 months

12-18 months

18-24 months

24-36 months

36-42 months

48-60 months


Expressive Language

9-12 months

Semantics

12-18 months

Semantics Syntax

18-24 months

Semantics Morphology Syntax

24-30 months

Semantics Morphology Syntax

30-36 months

Semantics Morphology Syntax

36-42 months

Semantics Morphology Syntax

42-48 months

Semantics Morphology Syntax

48-54 months

Semantics Morphology Syntax

54-60 months

Semantics Morphology Syntax
Receptive Language

9-12 months

12-18 months

18-24 months

24-30 months

30-36months

36-42 months

42-48 months

48-54 months


Signs of hearing loss

0-12 months

12-24 months


Birth To Three Screening This is from an Early Intervention pamphlet

3 months - most babies:

6 months - most babies:

12 months - most babies:

18 months - most babies:

24 months - most babies:

36 months - most babies:


Test Scores

When first seeing the array of evaluation test scores with different units it was confusing. We were given scores in standard score, percentile, and standard deviations, also age equivalent or months delayed or percent delayed which is not the same as percentile above.

Percentile goes from 1 to 100 percent but it's not like 90% is an A or 60% meant you got 6 out of 10 right. It is a comparing it against other scores. For example a score of 5% (5th percentile) means you did better than about 4% and worse than about 95%. Adding in the percentile you are in makes it come to 100 (4 + 1 + 95 = 100). 50% would be considered average - about half the kids did better and about half worse

Standard deviation maps to percentage. About 2/3 of the the kids will test within plus or minus 1 standard deviation of the norm. About 1/6 will score more than 1 standard deviation below the norm and about 1/6 will score more than 1 standard deviation above the norm. About 1/50 kids score 2 standard deviations below the norm and ditto above.

Standard scores also map to percentiles and standard deviations. IQ tests are scored this way where 100 is average = 50% = 0 standard deviations. To covert take the mean minus the standard score divided by the standard deviation: 100 - 70 divided by 15 = 2.00 standard deviations below. 85 is 1 standard deviation below the norm which is about at the 16% mark and 115 is 1 standard deviation above the norm which is about at the 84% mark. Everything in this range is considered WNL (Within Normal Limits).

Some sub tests use a standard score of 10 with a standard deviation of 3 so a sub test score of 7 = 16% = 1 standard deviation below the norm. Some scores may be given as a raw score so you would need to convert to one of the other formats

If a kid who is 36 months old is said to be 9 months delayed than they are (36 - 9 = 27) at an age equivalent of 27 months and that would be a (36/9 = .25 = 25%) 25% delay. That also means that would be average or 50 percentile for a 27 month old. If your 36 month old score 50% on a given test that would be at a 36 month level or 0 months delayed or 0% delayed. You would have to look at the individual tests to go between standard score, percentile, and standard deviation and age equivalent or months delayed or percent delayed.

The Delay in the below table is where it starts for example a moderate delay is 1.50 - 1.99 standard deviations below the norm.
Delay Standard Deviation Standard Score Percentile
Severe -2.0 70 2%
Moderate -1.5 77.5 7%
Minor -1.0 85 16%
WNL 0.0 100 50%
+1.0 115 84%
+2.0 130 98%

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